Wildest Parts Competition – 2011 Winners


The Mastercam Wildest Parts Competition challenges students to design and machine something new and different. Students can send in anything they have made during the school year that meets the competition standards. The competition is open to students from any school worldwide using a licensed copy of Mastercam.

We are thrilled to have had another tough year of judging the Wildest Parts Competition. The scores this year were very close. We would like to thank all of the participants and their instructors for taking the time to enter the competition.

Awards
  • Everyone who enters receives a Mastercam T-shirt.
  • The overall winners in each of the secondary and post-secondary divisions receive $1,000. Their instructors receive $100 vouchers to www.iMastercamStore.com. In addition, the winners and instructors each receive a Mastercam Wildest Parts plaque.
  • Second place winners each receive $250. Their instructors receive $50 vouchers to www.iMastercamStore.com.
  • Third place winners each receive $75. Their instructors receive $25 vouchers to www.iMastercamStore.com.

Secondary Division
First Place – Gear Guitar by Ryan Koning, Hamilton High School, Hamilton, Montana (instructor Brent Holmes)
This guitar was a huge undertaking for a high school student. Over the years, we have received a number of guitar bodies but this is the first complete full-size guitar we have received. It is especially impressive that Koning machined the neck. Necks require large CNC travels and multiple set-ups which can make them very difficult to machine, especially for students using school machines.
Second Place – Door Harp by Sarah Del Rae, Hamilton High School, Hamilton, Montana (instructor Brent Holmes)
Decades ago, when we started the Wildest Parts Competition, this was just the type of part we hoped we would be receiving. Del Rae’s creative design featured an elk against a silhouette of a mountain and is the first door harp we have ever received.
Third Place – Desk Calendar by Rena Brown, Green Country Technology Center, Okmulgee, Oklahoma (instructor Jerry Logan)
Although limited, the machining on this desk calendar is very clean. In addition to being a functional desk calendar, the working gears and knob make this an interesting ‘moving sculpture’ for any desk.
Postsecondary Division
First Place – Gear Clock by Steven DiNieri, Erie Community College, Williamsville, New York (instructor Nate Witkowski)
While we’ve seen a number of clocks throughout the years, this is the first metal clock. We were very impressed by this complex entry. The multitude of well-made working parts showcased DiNieri’s design and machining skills and showed the huge amount of time he invested in the project. DiNieri’s write-up on creating the part is among the best we’ve ever received.
Second Place – Boomerang Yo-Yo by Aaron Otoka, Erie Community College, Williamsville, New York (instructor Nate Witkowski)
From Otoka’s great project write-up, it is clear how much thought he put into planning his superior yo-yo. His yo-yo design included both a clutch that will kick in when a ‘sleeping’ yo-yo loses RPMs and ball bearings. With the addition of the ball bearings, Otoka’s yo-yo was able to ‘sleep’ for over 60% longer than the commercial yo-yo with a clutch that he tested it against. Otoka also designed and created a storage box that integrated wrenches for the yo-yo. All of his pieces featured a gleaming polish that impressed all the judges.
Third Place – Mastercam Edge-Lit Sign by Mary Anne Steves, Erie Community College, Williamsville, New York (instructor Nate Witkowski)
This acrylic, metal, and LED sign featured very high quality workmanship. Steves created her design on two separate pieces of acrylic to allow for two colors of lighting. The LEDs and pieces of acrylic all fit into a well-made metal base that Steves also designed and machined.

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